Tag Archives: mental health

What we can learn from Everyone Else…

Gary Thomas on what we can learn from ‘everyone else’

13 February 2011

A red carpet leading up some stairs

Where could this lead you - Seriously?

I’ve been talking to a couple of people recently about ambitions. Okay, mainly my ambitions, but certainly ambitions.

You see, I want to aim quite high, so at a recent arts meeting in London (more to be revealed eventually!) I stated in a sort of unsure voice in a room full of disabled artists – “I want to be mainstream”.

And then, after a pause: “I want to be nominated for the Turner Prize.” Yep. That’s what I said. And now I’ve written it down. Shit me. Silly isn’t it?

Well, nope, not really. Definitely not silly. You see, I’m an artist and filmmaker, and albeit I didn’t go to Central St. Martins or where ever most artists go to study, I’ve had funding from the Arts Council, I’ve been commissioned, I’ve had a short film bought by a distributor in LA.

So why shouldn’t we look at our work and say ‘I want to win…’ whatever it is that will take your career to the next level?

But where on earth do I get these notions from?

One such influence is Chris Jones,  and his filmmaking course which I have just started taking this weekend.

Chris set out to make a short film and said, in a rather public way: “I want to win an Oscar.” He asked people for money, got the money, and made a film that reached the final round of voting in the Oscars, just before they chose the actual nominations. They missed out on an Oscar, but the got very very close, and made a good film because of it. Which got people’s attention. And although Chris is a ‘mainstream’ filmmaker (I’m assuming that) there’s a lot we can learn from everyone who put themselves out there.

They documented the process & they’ve now put it online with interviews, clips, and everything you need to look at your filmmaking journey.

I’m on section 3 of the course at the moment, and already there’s been some valuable insights into where I am, and what to do next. Some of which has reconfirmed what I already know, others have been first time insights. And when I get to the next stage of the course, there will be more. If the film-making journey is something you’d like to learn more about, I’d definitely recommend taking the course yourself.

In a short while, I’m going to be blatantly asking people for money. I need to think about how I do this seriously, how can I do it with the right support from people etc, and how I can do it legally too. I want to make a major work set a couple of days after the 2012 London Olympics.

It’s not something I can do on a low budget, so will be needing all the support from people and companies that I can convince. Although it’s a ‘short split screen film’ it’ll be a major work… So who’s with me?

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Frustration, Risk and Money

I am an intellectual. No, I’m not just saying that to show off or anything, I did an online quiz at www.oprah.com and it told me so. It also said my need for helping others was my lowest score, (no surprise there) and creativity was up there in the highest marks (12 points) but my thirst for knowledge was paramount (14 points).

I wonder if this is why I’m feeling frustrated at the moment, which I really am right now. I would like to use this frustration to take risks that would mean I can get on with the work that I so want to do, but this all requires money, and there’s the sticking point. So what to do? So many things revolve around money, but it takes other people to also make decisions (and I’m not talking about mental health or any systems here) so, should that be a reason why I can’t get on and do stuff?

I can’t progress with the choices I have until I have the money to do so. Although, that’s not strictly true, I can write stuff, I can write an application, I can rewrite my feature screenplay. I can do quite a bit of writing really, though anything else pretty much relies on me having funding.

A friend put a post on Facebook I noticed which said, without Capitalism there wouldn’t be any mental health problems. I thought this was kind of interesting, and actually hard for me to argue against.

Although, I’m sure if I lived somewhere without the 9-5 working hours and pressure on jobs etc. mental health ‘issues’ would still be around. Probably arising from boredom and frustration…

Which brings me back to where I am now. And out of that, I can only hope I’ll grow, and change. But its a slow process, unless anyone has a spare five grand they want to donate, in which case I’ll possibly be less frustrated…